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Hesterville Chapter 3                                          Thoughts from a Foxhole

Destiny – Episode Five, The Strongest Evidence

  • January 14, 2024
  • 5 Comments
5 Comments

Comments

    • Rabbi Reinman

      Apr 10, 2024

      They do, but a collective memory of what? Christians have a collective memory of Paul traveling to the communities and preaching. They do not have a collective memory of Jesus delivering a sermon on the mount to thousands of people. Those thousands of people were supposedly Jews, but the Jewish people have no collective memory of it. Muslims have a collective memory of Mohammed, that he was a charismatic leader and people believed what he said, but they do not have a collective memory of the angel Gavriel teaching the Koran to him. For that they have only Mohammed's word.

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      • Yisroel Stein

        Apr 11, 2024

        Thank you for your videos, including the ones on the parsha. 2 points if I may, 1. The Christians and the Muslims do believe in the revelation at Sinai (although I can't really call it collective anymore). Netflix just made a 3 part feature, (I didn't watch it) that is about the Exodus and splitting of the sea, with commentaries from "prominent" Muslims, Christians, and Jews. They say it is very popular. 2. Your explanation about the painting having the ability to appreciate the painter doesn't really explain why Hashem felt compelled to create that painting. To say that Hashem needs praise from the painting.... At the end of the day, human intellect can never really know why Hashem created the world, or does anything for that matter. Ramchal's reason, too, ultimately ends up with an I don't know (create the world without Nahama D'Kissufa and just give us the reward). These are more like the Taamei Hamitzvos which we can never really know the real reasons, they are just to make them more palatable to us. Thank You

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        • Rabbi Reinman

          Apr 11, 2024

          God does not feel compelled to create the painting. Is God compelled to perform acts of kindness? Of course not. He perform those acts because He is kind. His attribute of kindness expresses itself in acts of kindness. Similarly, God creates incredible masterpieces because He is creative. His attribute of creativity expresses itself in acts of creation. Furthermore, He does not seek praise from His painting. He wants His painting to recognize Him, because that recognition is the ultimate fulfillment of the creative enterprise of the universe. This is a painting that actually recognizes its painter of its own free will! It is beyond incredible. It is divine. I believe this may be essentially what the Ramchal is saying. God created the world because he wants to do good. According to the Rambam in the Moreh, the definition of good is contraction, and the definition of evil is destruction. God is good. He constructs. In other words, He creates. There is no real need to reward. We should recognize Him because that is why we exist. Lishmah. See Taanis 25a-b and Rashi. A tzaddik really should get no reward. According to the Rambam in the Moreh, we should go as far as we can in yedias Hashem before we say, "I don't know. That is His inscrutable will." Thank you for listening. I hope to hear from you again in the future. Comments such as yours are very much a part of the Destiny Project.

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          • Yisroel Stein

            Apr 12, 2024

            Amazing! Thank you. It's incredibly enjoyable. Although I don't feel qualified to even start a discussion with you. Just to clarify, the Ramchal would hold that creation alone would suffice even without reward, because reward is not necessarily the definition of good? Also, Yedias Hashem is our ultimate goal. But if someone is looking for a reason to be non-believer, they will always come up with some rational. Therefore it's possible that knowing what Hashem wants from us is more important than knowing why. Bringing the proofs that Hashem gave us the Torah tells us what He wants. To me Yedias Hashem is knowing Hashem in every aspect of life, in every flower, in every cumulus cloud...recognizing Hashem everywhere, in every hashgocha pratis. Which leads to the increased relationship with Hashem. I do not want to get into a "One Nation Two Worlds" type of debate, because you are way more qualified to discuss these issues. However, I deal with many people that have many questions...and appreciate these discussions, which is why I dare to comment. "Compelled" was a bad choice of wording.

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